How Those Visits to Facebook Might Be Killing You

Your life is not found in your ability to match the awesomeness of your friend’s pictures.

I’m finding that it’s very easy to compare myself and my life and what I can and can’t do with what I see other people doing. Someone posts a picture of a vacation in Europe or some exotic vacation, and I get discouraged that I myself haven’t been able to go. Before I started dating the Girlfriend, it was when someone changed their relationship status.

I’m sure some of you can relate to this. Someone gets a new job; you still hate yours. Someone manages to buy a new house while you’re struggling to find a buyer for yours, even as you start to come to grips with the fact that you’re not going to make as much money on the purchase as you thought. A bunch of your friends went out last Friday night and posted the pictures, but you couldn’t go out yourself or you could have but you’d still awkward doing that kind of thing alone. That one married couple is pregnant, while you’ve been trying for months and still haven’t added that extra pair of feet to your family.

I think this is why, thousands of years ago, God warned us against wanting what other people have. That’s no way to live a life. It’s a perfect way to kill it, which I think is one of the reasons why Scripture warns us against the art of coveting. Sin is always self destructive, and covetousness is no different.

Not only are we never satisfied with what we have (and let’s face it, if you can read this through your own personal Internet connection, you’re not doing nearly as bad as most people in the world), but we constantly measure our lives by what we own and have done instead of by whether we are what God created us to be: lovers, glorious lovers of Him and everyone around us.

Our lives were supposed to be rooted in love. This is the life that Jesus lived, and it’s the life that he offers us through his death and resurrection.

We each were made for more than to wish we had more or were doing something else. We certainly were made for more than constantly being jealous of other people who have what we don’t.

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6 thoughts on “How Those Visits to Facebook Might Be Killing You

  1. Jane June 10, 2012 / 8:45 am

    I totally loved this! I was guilty about 2 seconds before I read this! Thanks!

    • Justin June 10, 2012 / 1:48 pm

      I was guilty way before I wrote this. 🙂

  2. Rebecca June 10, 2012 / 5:23 pm

    I’ve thought about this before. Comparing my life to other lives I see on Facebook is so easy for me to do. And yet, no one posts pictures of sitting around the house or driving to work. When we compare our lives to what we see on Facebook, we’re comparing all aspects of our lives to only the exciting aspects of another person’s life. It’s an unfair and skewed comparison. A while back I preached a sermon and included a quote from a book by an author and I can’t remember what or who (though I can look it up) that talked about social media creating a generation of self-absorbed Christians. If we do something, we have to share it. Status and picture updates can easily turn into trying to proclaim to the world how important we feel we are. I’m not saying Facebook is wrong in and of itself, but I know it’s easy for me to get overly concerned with my image. Good points, Justin!

    • Justin June 14, 2012 / 9:30 am

      “Status and picture updates can easily turn into trying to proclaim to the world how important we feel we are.”

      This is very true.

  3. Andrea June 12, 2012 / 12:14 am

    I really liked this post. Paragraph “I think this is why, thousands of years ago, God warned us against wanting what other people have. That’s no way to live a life. It’s a perfect way to kill it, which I think is one of the reasons why Scripture warns us against the art of coveting. Sin is always self destructive, and covetousness is no different.”…so good, so true.

    • Justin June 14, 2012 / 9:30 am

      Thanks, Andrea! 🙂

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